6 Places Germs Breed In A Plane

If you ever fly, this is disturbing. It might make you want to take a shower right now. Did you think the water the flight attendant served you was clean?  That pillow that came wrapped in plastic might be gift-wrapped bacteria. This article addresses those, as well as tray tables, seat pockets, and even the food.

6 Places Germs Breed In A Plane: Beware of airplane water, tray tables, seat pockets, pillows and lavatories

We dug deep to identify the major germ zones on planes (and tips to avoid them). No, you’re not likely to contract meningitis, but better safe than sorry, right?

GERM ZONE: seat pocket
FOR: Cold and influenza A, B, and C viruses

There’s a familiar routine to settling in on a plane: Store your luggage in the overhead bin and deposit any personal items you want to be readily available in your seat pocket. But reaching into that pocket is akin to putting your hand in someone else’s purse and rummaging among their used tissues and gum wrappers. Toenail clippings and mushy old French fries are even nastier surprises that have been found in seat pockets. Consider that cold and influenza viruses can survive for hours on fabric and tissues, and even longer (up to 48 hours) on nonporous surfaces like plastic and metal — and you realize that you might pick up more than that glossy flight magazine when you reach inside.

GERM ZONE: tray table
FOR: MRSA, a deadly superbug

Flight attendants have witnessed many repulsive misuses of the tray table, from parents changing dirty diapers to kids sticking their boogers underneath. Research confirms that the handy tray table is a petri dish for all kinds of health hazards, including the superbug Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA), which is often fatal once contracted. It kills an estimated 20,000 Americans annually. In 2007, University of Arizona researcher Jonathan Sexton tested tray tables from three major airliners, and an alarming 60 percent tested positive for the superbug. That’s quite a revelation considering only 11 percent of his samples from the New York subway found traces of the bug.

TIP: Bring disinfectant wipes to clean off your tray table before and after use, and never eat directly off the surface. CDC guidelines tell you what to look for in a disinfectant and recommend checking a product’s label to see if MRSA is on the list of bacteria it kills; Lysol disinfecting wipes is one reliable choice. And be sure to protect any cuts with Band-Aids—the most common way of contracting an MRSA infection is through open skin.

GERM ZONE: airplane meal

FOR: Listeria, a microbe known to cause gastrointestinal illness and meningitis

In-flight meals have long had a bad reputation for consisting of bland, barely identifiable dishes. Then, in 2009, the meals made headlines when FDA inspections of the Denver location of LSG Sky Chefs — the world’s largest airplane caterer with clients including American Airlines, Delta, and United — found the kitchens crawling with roaches too numerous to count and employees handling the food with bare hands or unwashed gloves. Test samples from the food preparation area also found traces of Listeria monocytogenes, which can cause gastrointestinal illness and meningitis, as well as cervical infection in pregnant women. Your likelihood of contracting illness from the microbe is very low, though it should be noted that one fifth of the 2,500 annual cases are fatal. LSG Sky Chefs, to its credit, responded accordingly after the news broke and passed the FDA’s follow-up inspection in January 2010.

TIP: It sounds like LSG has cleaned up its act, but you’ll never really know where your meal has been. If you’re concerned, eat beforehand and bring your own snacks onto the plane. Check out our article on how to make a sandwich that will still be appetizing once you’re in the air. For starters, choose a well-cured meat like prosciutto or salami.

GERM ZONE: Airplane pillow and blankets
FOR: Germs like Aspergillus niger that cause pneumonia and infections

Talk about sleeping with the enemy. You’re snuggling with a blanket and pillow that have likely been used by many drowsy, drooling passengers before you. Unless visibly soiled, pillows and blankets are often reissued because of the frequency of flights. A 2007 investigation by The Wall Street Journal revealed that airlines cleaned their blankets every five to 30 days. And don’t assume your blanket is new just because it’s wrapped in plastic. The Union of Needletrades, Industrial, and Textile Employees made a big stink in 2000 when it accused Royal Airline Laundry — which supplies pillows and blankets to clients like American, United, and US Airways — of repackaging pillows and blankets without cleaning them properly. Its research found blankets with traces of Pseudomonas paucimobilis, known for causing lung and eye infections, and pillowcases with Aspergillus niger, which can lead to pneumonia and gastrointestinal bleeding. In the decade since, airlines like Southwest and Alaska Airlines have removed pillows and blankets completely, while JetBlue, US Airways, and American now charge for them.

TIP: There have been no documented reports linking airlines to these infections. But if you’re worried about staying warm — and want to avoid potential germs and airline fees — wear layers and thick socks, and consider bringing Grabber Warmers, small disposable hand and foot warmers. A travel pillow and compact blanket will help you sleep in comfort.

Related: Vote for America’s Coolest Small Towns

GERM ZONE: airplane lavatory
FOR: A smorgasbord of threats like E. coli or fecal bacteria

After a mid-flight nap, you wake up to nature’s call and must face the airplane’s biggest germ zone: the lavatory. With hundreds of people using the commode daily, the small boxy space is a natural haven for all kinds of germs and viruses, especially on the door handle (do you really think every passenger washes his or her hands?). And that thunderous volcanic toilet flush doesn’t exactly help the situation, spraying water and releasing potential germs into the air every which way. The CDC cited the lavatory as a major danger area for the spread of disease during the H1N1 flu and SARS epidemics.

TIP: Use a paper towel to close the toilet lid before flushing — and then leave without washing your hands. Remember that cloudy tank water we described above? The sink water comes from the same source. You’ll come away cleaner if you skip the sink and reach for hand sanitizer instead.

Article continues at Budget Travel’s website and at  MSNBC.

[Ross, thanks for sending it to me. As if I wasn’t enough of a germaphobe yet…]

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